Services

Our goal is to make sure each and every client is educated enough about the prospective property, they can make an informed real-estate investment decision.

Inspection Exclusions

The following items are not part of the and will not be included in the property inspection or the subsequent report. However, we are happy to put you in contact with someone who can assist with these areas.

New Home Inspection

When buying a new home, many people have a false sense of security that everything will be perfect when they move in. Once the builder completes your new home, they will have it inspected by their own inspector, and in accordance with their guidelines. It is important that you have someone inspect the home to ensure that everything is correct when taking the keys to your new home. Keep in mind that you typically only have one year to report any problems to the builder for it to be covered in their warranty. In addition to new home inspections, we also offer a phased new home construction inspection. Read about the differences between the two inspections and which is best for you.

Pre-Owned Home Inspections

A residential property inspection is an integral part of every real estate transaction. The goal of a home inspection is to educate the prospective buyer on the condition of the homes’ structural systems, electrical systems, HVAC systems, plumbing systems, and built in appliances, as well as any other safety issues or concerns.

Foreclosure Inspections

The home buying process can be stressful enough. Now, add in the thought of buying a foreclosed property. In many cases, there is no sellers disclosure and you are buying the property “as is”. A foreclosure inspection by a licensed property inspector is paramount to understanding the current condition of the property as well as any potential hidden issues which could arise.

11 Month Warranty Inspections

 

An 11 month warranty inspection creates a “punch list”, where items that need attention are called out. This punch list should then be discussed with your builder before the warranty period expires. In many cases, items might be discovered during a warranty inspection for which the builder is not responsible (for example adjusting the garage door opener installed by the homeowner), but it nevertheless presents a safety hazard that needs attention. Warranty inspections, unlike a real estate buyer’s inspection, might call out cosmetic deficiencies.

If your home is currently under a builder’s warranty that is about to expire, an 11 month inspection is money and time well spent.

Phased New Home Construction Inspections

Buyers of re-sale homes almost always have their home inspected by a licensed home inspector. Buyers of new homes, however, often do not take this important step. There are several reasons for this:

  • The buyer is getting a brand new home, and thinks that the inspection is an unnecessary added cost.
  • The buyer feels that they are protected by the builder’s one-year warranty for workmanship, plus extended structural warranty.
  • In many cases, city inspectors inspect the home as a part of the permitting process.
  • Buyers believe that they can rely on the builder’s reputation.
  • The builder is resistant to the idea of third party inspections.
  • Buyers are not aware that a home inspection is a recommended alternative.
  • The buyer plans to “keep an eye” on the construction.

Pre-Listing Inspections

An 11 month warranty inspection creates a “punch list”, where items that need attention are called out. This punch list should then be discussed with your builder before the warranty period expires. In many cases, items might be discovered during a warranty inspection for which the builder is not responsible (for example adjusting the garage door opener installed by the homeowner), but it nevertheless presents a safety hazard that needs attention. Warranty inspections, unlike a real estate buyer’s inspection, might call out cosmetic deficiencies.

If your home is currently under a builder’s warranty that is about to expire, an 11 month inspection is money and time well spent.

Relocation Inspections

When corporate America relocates their employees, many times, the company will offer their employees a relocation package as an incentive to have them relocate. A relocation inspection is performed to see what the condition of a house is when a homeowner is relocated by their employer.

Green Energy Audits

A typical home inspection is not deigned to provide information about the efficiency with which a home uses energy. Home energy use is related to the materials and methods used in building the home, its design, and the efficiency of the appliances installed. An energy auditor uses different tools and has a different set of skills than a home inspector.

Inspection Exclusions
  1. Inspection of private or community water wells.
  2. Inspection of septic systems.
  3. Inspection of crawlspaces with obstructed openings, inadequate clearance or ponding water.
  4. Determining property boundary lines or encroachments.
  5. Determining the condition of any component or system that is not readily accessible.
  6. Predict the service life expectancy of any component or system.
  7. Determining the presence of evidence of rodents, birds, animals, insects, or other pests.
  8. Determining the presence of mold, mildew, or fungus.
  9. Determining the presence of airborne hazards including but not limited to: lead paint, asbestos and/or toxic dry wall.
  10. Determining the air quality of the home and surrounding areas.
  11. Identify any manufacturers’ recalls or conformance with manufacturer installation, or any information included for consumer protection purposes.
  12. Determining the existence of electromagnetic fields.
  13. Identify any hazardous waste conditions.
  14. Determining the presence of airborne hazards, including radon.
  15. Provide replacement or repair cost estimates.
  16. Provide estimates of the cost to operate any given system.
  17. Predicting the remaining life or functionality of any home component or system
  18. Inspecting water softeners, security systems or home audio ot video equipment or cables.
Phased New Home Construction Inspections

Schedule Inspection

Let the builder know at the outset that you will be getting a construction inspection. You may hear (from the builder or others) that this is unnecessary, that city inspections will be done, that this is an unusual step, etc. Stand your ground on this important inspection decision.

Foundation Inspection

With some complicated foundations, you should have an engineer review the construction as it progresses. In other cases, a licensed inspector is perfect for the job. Usually, city inspectors do a layout inspection, making sure that the foundation does not overlap building lines. Asl for a copy of the “forms survey”, if the builder has one. If a forms survey has not been done, carefully measure from the property lines. If there is any doubt about whether the structure encroaches over building lines, have a survey done before proceeding. In addition to the layout, the inspector will check the steel content, depth of footings, post tension cables, and other parts of the foundation.

Pre-Sheetrock Inspection

Most builders invite the homeowner to do a walk through after framing. HVAC and plumbing rough-in, and electrical wiring are complete. This is a good time to look at your outlet locations and window and door placements. Make sure that any changes in the plans have been picked up and made but the sub contractors.

While you check for layout items, your home inspector can look closely at the construction The report will include any broken plumbing lines, improper flashing, cut or bowed studs, inadequate bracing, beams that over span their strength, AC ducts that are crushed, etc. These items are easy to correct before sheet rock and finish materials are installed.

It is not realistic to expect the construction company to check out perfectly. Every builder in every price range will have some items to correct, both from the city and the third party inspector. Let your builder know that you will provide him with the report immediately, so that he can address the items before the walls are up.

Final Inspection

You will need to have all utilities on in order to complete this inspection. Normally, the builder requests a “walk-thru” inspection with you when the house is substantially complete. If utilities are on, you could schedule your inspector at this same time. You can focus on paint, and touch up items while your inspector conducts a more thorough inspection, checking for leaks, non functional outlets, final grading of the lot, flashing problems, appliance operation, voids in mortar, etc.

At some point you may sell your home, and your buyer will likely have your home inspected. Some of the items the inspector catches now may seem minor, but they will come up later in your buyer’s inspection if they are not corrected. It is in your best interest to have everything nailed down now. If there are items that cannot be fixed before closing, and you cannot delay closing, ask the builder to sign a written list of items to be repaired or completed.

Schedule your home inspection today to ensure that you are fully informed about the new property that you are buying.

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Contact Info

Steve Kelly Owner/Professional Inspector TREC#20498

15201 Mason Road, #1000-381 Cypress, TX 77433

713-449-2950

832-218-4205